Send your opinions and articles to editor@thenews-chronicle.com or info@thenews-chronicle.com. For adverts and sponsorship send to adverts@thenews-chronicle.com

What we’re eating and drinking at the 2018 Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival

Guerrilla Tacos at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival. Click the photo for more. (Luis Sinco)

Guerrilla Tacos at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival. Click the photo for more. (Luis Sinco)

The countdown to the moment Beyoncé takes the main stage at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival is officially on. How should you occupy yourself while you wait?

Maybe two scoops of Van Leeuwen ice cream in a waffle cone. Or a mutli-course dinner from chef Curtis Stone’s Gwen pop-up restaurant. Tacos from Guerrilla Tacos.

Feel like a burger? Christian Page is cooking up cheeseburgers at the Cassell’s booth. And chef Shirley Chung (who is opening her restaurant Ms Chi in downtown L.A. soon) is making dumplings lashed with chile oil.

Lucky for you and your constant need for a snack (also known as your why-isn’t-Beyoncé-here-yet-distraction), some of L.A.’s best chefs are cooking at the festival.

And this year, Nic Adler, the man behind all the food and drinks, rolled out a new food hall called the Indio Central Market. Sound familiar? It was inspired by Grand Central Market in downtown L.A. and offers some of the best bites, and shade at the festival.

Check out the photo gallery below for a look at what we’re eating while we wait for Queen B.

And if you want a full rundown of all the best food and drinks at the festival, check out our list here.

________________________________________________________________________________

Apr. 14, 2018, 11:03 a.m.

Electronic luminary Jean-Michel Jarre dazzles a Coachella that’s at a crossroads

Jean-Michel Jarre appears at Coachella. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

Jean-Michel Jarre appears at Coachella. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

In 2018, Coachella is for hip-hop and R&B.

That much is certain, from the headliners on down. But it wasn’t that long ago that the festival had tilted hard to EDM, putting DJ-driven spectacles as grand finales and loading up the dance-focused Sahara Tent with as much LED firepower as it could muster.

A two-hour stretch after the Coachella dinner shift showed that the festival’s electronic music future is going to get weirder and better but also hokier and decidedly more lowbrow.

First, the bad news.

Instead of first-wave EDM acts like Calvin Harris or Swedish House Mafia — which at least had quality pop singles and could pull a consistent club set together — the last survivors of festival EDM are barnacles on the hull of the S.S. Coachella.

Kygo, the Norwegian “tropical house” producer, is a singularly loathsome figure for stripping nearly every element of substance from dance music (including catchy, repetitive uplift) and replacing it with pan flutes and steel drums designed to max out your credit card at fashion retailer Topman before you hit the booze cruise with your college buds. Naturally, he’s a superstar.

Deorro, meanwhile, siphoned out all the songwriting and big-tent appeal of EDM, leaving behind only a pile of warmed-over French and Dutch house synths and sneering pilfers of much better Latin club music. The low-rent circus scene onstage only added to the sense that this was a clown show. Naturally, he had a peak-time Sahara Tent show.

These are the signs of a cultural moment in terminal decline. But a fan could quickly shake it off with a quick pass through the smaller Yuma stage to see one of the festival’s more ingenious super-groups.

Detroit Love is a trio of groundbreaking deejays and producers from the Motor City: Carl Craig, Moodymann and their younger peer Kyle Hall. All three are essential, if mercurial, figures from the city’s techno history and present, grafting dusty soul vocal samples into hard-knuckled drums and frequent forays into jazzy experiments.

Put all three onstage at once, though, and they swing for the fences. Their set was a merciless masterclass in building a night from the most rudimentary pieces, taking a single bone-shaking drum loop and building off it until it hit an almost rapture. Then they’d drop a howling gospel or soul sample in on top, and the thing really would start to feel like church.

Across the Outdoor Stage, Jean-Michel Jarre was up to something much different but even more ambitious. The French composer was an early proponent of the synthesizer’s potential, not only to add to rock but to create entirely new universes, and he loved taking over public spaces with high-concept light shows.

His cosmic-sized ambiance and hulking arpeggios made him a progressive era superstar — this is music that feels mind-altering. His crowd sizes are instruments in themselves, as he had over 1 million for one legendary Bastille Day set in France.

His Coachella crowd wasn’t quite that scale, but the effect remained. This was the Hans Zimmer slot of 2018 — a composer using sheer heft to overpower an audience who might not know his face but certainly knows a spectacle when it sees one.

Jarre’s set covered his whole ’70s career prime, but the arrangements and visuals were never remotely dated. All you could do was find a spot of grass, look up at the stars and be overwhelmed.

________________________________________________________________________________

Apr. 13, 2018, 10:45 p.m.

 

Vince Staples brings out Kendrick Lamar to close Coachella set on what he called the ‘white people stage’

Vince Staples, left, and Kendrick Lamar greet each other onstage at the 2018 Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival on April 13, 2018. (Kevin Winter)

Vince Staples, left, and Kendrick Lamar greet each other onstage at the 2018 Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival on April 13, 2018. (Kevin Winter)

Vince Staples had a lot of people talking Friday night after the 24-year-old emcee dropped two bombshells during his set at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival.

Staples performed on the festival’s main stage, calling it the “white people stage” and saying, “I know y’all don’t know who I am cause none of y’all look like me, but I don’t give a … .”

For his final song, he brought out surprise guest Kendrick Lamar for a performance of “Yeah Right,” a song featured on his 2017 album “Big Fish Theory.” The crowd, which many characterized as “dry” on Twitter, went wild once Lamar appeared onstage.

  The California rappers have collaborated in the past on “Opps,” a song featured on Lamar’s “Black Panther The Album — Music from and Inspired By,” the soundtrack for Marvel’s “Black Panther.”

________________________________________________________________________________

Apr. 13, 2018, 10:39 p.m.

Whethan brings the yodel kid to Coachella and the internet freaks out

Yodeler Mason Ramsey, left, and electronic dance artist Whethan perform Friday at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival. (Amy Harris / Invision / Associated Press)

Yodeler Mason Ramsey, left, and electronic dance artist Whethan perform Friday at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival. (Amy Harris / Invision / Associated Press)

The Sahara Tent provided the clearest definition of what the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival has become when 11-year-old Mason Ramsey took the stage Friday afternoon alongside electronic dance artist Whethan.

Two weeks ago the preteen from Golconda, Ill., was unknown, and then a video of him yodeling in a Walmart went viral and he became an overnight sensation — with his own hashtags: #WalmartYodelBoy and #WalmartYodelingKid.

With few events as trendy as Coachella — just check your Instagram and Twitter feeds — it was no surprise Mason’s arrival was met with rapturous applause and not with the nod of irony one might expect.

 “Everybody took your picture, right?” Whethan asked after the kid nervously pushed through a performance of the Hank Williams Sr. classic that made him a celebrity.

It was a moment that aptly distilled the culture of the festival as a can’t-miss destination for music fans — and those who just want to be seen.

 

 

 

_______________________________________________________________________________

Apr. 13, 2018, 8:14 p.m.

By MIKAEL WOOD

Bleachers proves the spirit of ‘the Boss’ is alive and well at Coachella

Jack Antonoff of Bleachers. (Rich Fury / Getty Images/Coachella)

Jack Antonoff of Bleachers. (Rich Fury / Getty Images/Coachella)

Jack Antonoff remade Bruce Springsteen’s boomer-friendly arena rock for a millennial audience as he led his band Bleachers inside Coachella’s packed Mojave tent Friday afternoon.

Wearing high-waisted dad jeans and a black sleeveless T-shirt, the singer and guitarist from Springsteen’s home state of New Jersey told the crowd that he’d written his sad songs all alone in his room — then added that they didn’t sound so sad now that thousands were singing along.

Antonoff, who’s also an in-demand producer for the likes of Lorde and Taylor Swift, brought out Carly Rae Jepsen to sing a pair of tunes: “Hate That You Know Me” and “Alfie’s Song (Not So Typical Love Song),” from the soundtrack of “Love, Simon.”

________________________________________________________________________________

Apr. 13, 2018, 8:13 p.m.

Scenes from the first day of Coachella

People walk by the Palm-3 World Station art installation. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

People walk by the Palm-3 World Station art installation. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

Jet Inarda, L, Chris Leo, and Mel Santander, all of San Francisco, walk by the Supernova sculpture by Roberto Behard and Rosario Marquardt. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

Jet Inarda, L, Chris Leo, and Mel Santander, all of San Francisco, walk by the Supernova sculpture by Roberto Behard and Rosario Marquardt. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

Attendees explore the "Spectra" art installation by Newsubstance. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

Attendees explore the “Spectra” art installation by Newsubstance. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

________________________________________________________________________________

Apr. 13, 2018, 7:57 p.m.

Kali Uchis’ ebuillent new tracks only add to the desert heat

Kali Uchis performs at Coachella's Outdoor Theater. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

Kali Uchis performs at Coachella’s Outdoor Theater. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

Kali Uchis’ new album is called “Isolation,” but she was anything but alone at her set at Coachella’s Outdoor Theater on Friday.

The Colombian American singer is one of the quintessential new pop voices right now, running Amy Winehouse’s melancholy soul through a contemporary sheen of dub reggae, Latin pop and hip-hop brashness, all with a very East L.A. sense of history and longing (even though she was raised in Virginia).

She’s become an adopted favorite of L.A. — her Coachella warmup set in downtown and her gig at the recent Tropicalia fest were all slammed with eager fans who knew every word in English and Spanish.

Her Friday set was no different — “In My Dreams” had a buoyant escapism and early-rock-and-roll backbeat, while “Dead To Me” was all disco sass. “Tyrant” was slower rolling, perfect driving music for the road out to the desert. And when Tyler, the Creator came out for “After the Storm,” he was still just the second-most charismatic person onstage.

It didn’t matter that the crowds were so big she was barely visible from the far end of the field. Uchis is also one of the best physical performers going today, a truly gifted dancer who commands the stage with a range of alluring, impassioned or just plain ebullient moves.

Even on a screen, you just had to watch her. She was the perfect companion for the late-afternoon desert smoulder.

________________________________________________________________________________

Apr. 13, 2018, 6:52 p.m.

A closer look at Coachella fans

Ivan Gaxeola, 21, of Sinaloa, Mexico, lights up the crowd. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

Ivan Gaxeola, 21, of Sinaloa, Mexico, lights up the crowd. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

Chelsea Chang, left, 26, and Trisha Fuerte, 24, right, both from San Francisco, band together. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

Chelsea Chang, left, 26, and Trisha Fuerte, 24, right, both from San Francisco, band together. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

Maria Herrera, 29, of New York City turns reflective. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

Maria Herrera, 29, of New York City turns reflective. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

Jose Lepucio, 23, of Des Moines keeps cool with an icy treat. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

Jose Lepucio, 23, of Des Moines keeps cool with an icy treat. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

________________________________________________________________________________

Apr. 13, 2018, 6:30 p.m.

Coachella turns to drones to update the modern fireworks show

Drones light up the sky at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Russia. (Sergei Grits / AP Photo)

Drones light up the sky at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Russia. (Sergei Grits / AP Photo)

In a very 2018 update to the classic fireworks show of yore, HP and Intel will fly drones over the Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival grounds Friday and Sunday night.

Weather permitting, the drones will fly before the Weeknd takes the stage Friday night and during Odesza’s set on Sunday, the first time a live drone show  will be used during a concert.

“We’ve done multiple events worldwide,” said Anil Nanduri, vice president and general manager of Intel’s drone team. The team has been responsible for drones used during the Bellagio’s water show, the Superbowl and the winter Olympics. “Bringing this together for an artist experience has its own charm.”

Four hundred and twenty plastic and foam drones will be used to form a painting in the sky. The computer-operated, human-piloted drones are reprogrammable, rechargeable and reusable, and at 330 grams, each weighs about the same as a volleyball. The battery life sustains them for about 20 minutes, though shows usually last between five and eight minutes.

“At the Olympics it was about the sports theme and showcasing a snowboard in the sky,” said Nanduri. “The Super Bowl was about integrating it into the halftime show. With Coachella being a premier music festival has its own charm.”

________________________________________________________________________________

Apr. 13, 2018, 6:21 p.m.

Azules’ cumbia beat: A well-received first for Coachella

Los Angeles Azules performs at the Coachella stage during Day 1 of the festival. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles Azules performs at the Coachella stage during Day 1 of the festival. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

The first performance slot on Coachella’s main stage isn’t exactly a coveted position at a desert festival where many fans don’t even bother to show up until after sundown.

But Los Ángeles Azules drew a relatively gigantic crowd in that spot on Friday afternoon — perhaps because its position on the bill wasn’t its only first.

Based near Mexico City, Los Ángeles Azules was the first traditional cumbia group to play Coachella, which has boosted its share of Latin music this year with additional bookings for the likes of Kali Uchis and Cuco.

On Friday, the slick but effective dance band — with 18 musicians onstage in carefully coordinated outfits — was welcomed with an enthusiasm that suggested festival-goers had been waiting for Coachella to embrace an important aspect of Southern California’s musical landscape.

Source: Losangelestimes

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Loading...